Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Module Five – Chapter Eight – PAPER RELIEF INTO FABRIC RELIEF – PART ONE



Chapter Eight requires that five paper relief surfaces made for Chapter 3 are each translated into two different ways in fabric. For an easy reference I have placed both the photographic record from Chapter 1 (on the left) and its related paper relief surface from Chapter 3 (on the right) before the picture of each fabric sample.


Fabric sample 1 – First translation into fabric


 metallo24-treSample ONE


The background is a layer of stitch and tear support irregularly wrinkled and sewn to a sheet of paper. On it fragments of different fabrics torn and shredded in imitation of rust “pebbles” (grey organza, cheesecloth, tulle net, cream-coloured jersey). Technique: appliqué.


Sample ONE bis


Detail

Sample ONE detail



Fabric sample 2 – Second translation into fabric


Sample ONEmetallo24-tre


For this second interpretation in fabric I made a sandwich of a printed cotton, grey lining, curtain fabric and tarlatan, stitched them all together with randomly wavy lines and cut irregular diamond areas to reveal the background layer in different ways. Technique: wadded quilting.


Sample TWO


Detail

Sample TWOdetail



Fabric sample 3 – First translation into fabric



 metallo15-base Sample TWO


For the background I burnt an old linen sheet with a candle in different areas and fixed it on a layer of soft kunin felt distressed along its edges. This background was then ripped and partially mended. Melted strips of synthetic net were stitched on it. Through the main gush at the centre different materials flourish from the bottom.  Techniques: burnt and melted edges, appliqué, wadded quilting.


Sample THREE bis



Detail

Sample THREE detail



 Fabric sample 4 – Second translation into fabric



metallo15-baseSample TWO


For this second interpretation I wanted to obtain a less textured surface with a shallow relief. Techniques: wadded quilting, appliqué, machine embroidery.


Sample FOUR


 Detail

Sample FOUR detail


Fabric sample 5 – First translation into fabric


 metallo5-dueSample THREE


For this heavily textured surface I prepared a substantial background with a sandwich of different fabrics, embroidered it, and made big tucks in all directions. I finished by padding some areas from the back. Techniques: wadded quilting, tucking, padded quilting.


Sample FIVE


 Detail

Sample FIVE detail



 Fabric sample 6 – Second translation into fabric



metallo5-dueSample THREE


Techniques: shaped quilting (for the rust “pebbles”), free machine embroidery in the recessed areas.


Sample SIX


 Detail

Sample SIX detail

Thursday, December 1, 2011

Module Five – Chapter SEVEN – TACTILE CONTRASTS



otto

I have finally put together my group of tactile samples!
From top to bottom and from left to right:

1 Zigzag gathering over a string – Habotai silk
2 Furrowing – Synthetic velvet
3 Wadded quilting – Habotai silk
4 Darts – Woven linen
5 Hand gathering – Cotton canvas
6 Wadded quilting – Habotai silk
7 Partially seamed tucks – Habotai silk
8 Snipped tucks – Habotai silk
9 Cross-tacked tucks – Habotai silk
10 Tucks set with a stay - Cheesecloth
11 Criss-crossing pintucks – Curtain net
12 Hand-gathered fabric strips, stitched together - Muslim
13 Blind tucks – Synthetic net
14 Cording – Tulle net
15 Irregular hand gathering – Kunin felt
16 Padded quilting – Woven cotton
17 Wadded quilting – Fleece padding and tulle net
18 Wadded quilting – String lengths and tulle net
19 Hand gathering with loose wool thread, loops cut and knotted
20 Wadded quilting with rose tea blossoms
21 Padded quilting with ties
22 Blind tucks, then slashed open – Synthetic felt
23 Slashed pintucks - Cheesecloth
24 Contoured tucks – Cotton net

And a couple of more detailed views:

detail 1
detail 4

Monday, November 14, 2011

Module Five – Chapter SIX – GATHERS

 

 

 SHEET ONE

UNDICI

 SAMPLES bis

1 Gathered by hand, then set by stitching

2 Machine gathered using a gathering foot

3 Machine gathered, gathering held by zigzag

4 Single-thread machine gathering

5 Wavy hand gathering set by irregular machine-stitching

6 Vertical and horizontal hand gathering

7 Dense machine gathering

8 Two row machine gathering

9 Hand gathering, gathers held by stitching

 

SHEET TWO

DODICI tris

samples TRIS

1 Machine gathering over a length of string

2, 3 Weave threads pulled, gathers held by hand stitching

4 Gathering by binding small wooden beads into the fabric

5 Weave threads pulled, then gentle gathering

 

 

I do not have a gathering machine, at least so far, and there is nobody around from whom could borrow it, so I could not try this fascinating method. I remember those beautiful samples made on Alison’s pleater at last year Summer School …Perhaps one day!

Friday, November 11, 2011

Module Five – Chapter SIX – TUCKS AND PLEATS

 

For working through this Chapter I used a combination of fabrics, mainly cotton muslim, habotai silk, cheesecloth and other open weaves, some natural and some man-made.

This is a fantastic subject to explore and I feel I just touched the tip of the iceberg, as usual ….

UNO bis

samples

1 Pin tucks

2 Spaced tucks

3 Blind tucks

4 Vertical pin tucks plus horizontal irregular ones

5 Topstitched spaced tucks

6 Box pleats stabilized with running stitch and interlaced

 

DUE bis SEVEN, EIGHT

7 Tucks stuffed with plastic straws

8 A doubled and centred tuck with secondary tuck stuffed and decorated

 

TRE

NINE, TEN (top) – ELEVEN, TWELVE (bottom)

9 Rows of contoured tucks, edges of tucks decorated with zigzag stitch

10 Irregular vertical tucks

11 Irregularly slanted tucks in two directions

12 Pin tucks alternating with rows of shell tucks

 

QUATTRO

THIRTEEN, FOURTEEN

13 Pleats with undulating and frayed edges

14 Dart tucks

 

CINQUE

FIFTEEN, SIXTEEN

15 Tucks with contoured fringes set by double rows of zigzag stitch

16 Snipped tucks

 

SEI

SEVENTEEN, EIGHTEEN

17 Irregular tucks, snipped

18 Partially seamed tucks crossing horizontally and vertically

 

SETTE

NINETEEN, TWENTY

19 Simply tied tucks

20 Partially seamed tucks, then joined by stitching

 

OTTO bis

TWENTY-ONE, TWENTY-TWO, TWENTY-THREE

21 Horizontal pin tucks, vertical slanted tucks

22 Network of intersecting pin tucks stitched with twin needles combined with dart tucks

23 Regular tucks criss-crossing on a twin-needled treated fabric

 

NOVE

TWENTY-FOUR, TWENTY-FIVE, TWENTY-SIX

24 First layer of slanted tucks, second layer of regular tucks

25 Parallel rows of tucks joined so to form diamond shapes

26 Dart tucks criss-crossing each other then snipped

 

DIECI

TWENTY-SEVEN, TWENTY-EIGHT

27 Random loose tucks fixed by stitching

28 Two fabrics covered with tucks, then cut into strips and joined together

Monday, September 19, 2011

Module Five – Chapter FIVE – PADDED AND CORDED QUILTING SAMPLES


 PADDED QUILTING SAMPLES

Top layer: habotai silk. Back layer: cotton muslim. Padded areas outlined with twin-needle machine stitching, using a white thread in the needles and a light brown thread in the bobbin. Small holes in the centre punctured with a large hand embroidery needle.
Padded Quilting 4 front
 Sample ONE, front
Padded Quilting 4 back
 Sample ONE, back

For this second sample the back is shown. For padding natural colour wool fleece is used, the single padded areas are cut with scissors and stitched with a mohair yarn leaving gaps through which the fleece may show.     
Padded Quilting 2
 Sample TWO

Cylinders of different sizes, sewn like tucks and stuffed.
Padded Quilting 3
 Sample THREE

Little irregular pillows separately sewn and stuffed, then joined, decorated with pressed paper shapes.
Padded Quilting 1
 Sample FOUR


CORDED QUILTING SAMPLES

Encasing of chenille yarn with zigzag stitch.
Corded Quilting 1
 Sample ONE

Cording with twin-needle stitching, back and front on the same side.
Corded Quilting 2

 Sample TWO

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Module Five – Chapter FIVE – WADDED AND SHAPED QUILTING SAMPLES



First post after holidays! I was finally able to put together all samples produced so far for this chapter in the weeks before leaving. Tomorrow I shall get everything ready for getting to work on the second part of Chapter 5.

WADDED QUILTING SAMPLES
General view
All my wadded samples are arranged on a A3 portfolio page

Wadded quilting Whole sheet
Sample ONE
Back: muslim – Padding: light wadding, one layer – Top: jersey
Wadded sample ONE
Sample TWO
Back: felt – Padding: shredded plastic – Top: light tulle – Stitchery: straight stitch in  white and light brown

Wadded sample TWO

Sample THREE
Back: muslim – Padding: cut threads, fabric bits, tea bags – Top: light tulle


Wadded sample THREE

Sample FOUR
Back: muslim – Padding: wool fleece – Top: cheesecloth
Wadded sample FOUR
Sample FIVE
Back: muslim – Padding: light wadding, two layers – Top: habotai silk – Appliqué: cheesecloth
Wadded sample FIVE
Sample SIX
Back: muslim – Padding: wool threads cut short – Top: very open mesh, partially cut in areas to expose wool underneath
Wadded sample SIX

SHAPED QUILTING SAMPLES
This second group of samples are somewhat bigger, each measuring approximately 12 x 12 cms
Sample ONE
Padding: plastic snowflakes
Top layer: very open mesh
Shaped Quilting 1
Sample TWO
Padding: pressed paper cylinders
Bottom/Top layer: linen net
Shaped Quilting 5
Sample THREE
Padding: foam cardboard shapes
Top layer: net

Shaped Quilting 4
Sample FOUR
Padding: knotted wadding
Top layer: habotai silk

Shaped Quilting 2
Sample FIVE
Padding: candies
Top layer: silver tulle net

Shaped Quilting 3

SAMPLES OF SHAPES USED FOR PADDING


IMG_1475
Shapes used:
Wadding strip knotted several times
Foam cardboard
Plastic snowflake
Candies
Pressed paper